Get your pond ready for fall with these easy steps!

Fall is finally here and chill is in the air. Get your pond ready with these easy steps!

Fall Pond Care  require a little TLC before winter comes in. Here is a checklist to getting your pond ready for winter in 10 easy steps:

Fall Pond Care
Fall Pond Care

Fall Pond Care 10 Easy Steps

  1.  Decaying leaves and foliage produce toxic gases that can harm your fish so you want to remove this debris before winter rolls into town. You don’t need to remove every single last leaf, but try to remove the majority.
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  2.  If you put protective pond netting over your pond before the leaves started to fall, your job is easy. Carefully roll up the net and discard the leaves that were caught.
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  3. If you didn’t use a net over the surface of your pond, you’ll need to remove the build-up of leaves from the bottom of the pond. Use a long handled pond net to scoop them out. Check your skimmer basket and remove any leaves that are still caught inside.
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  4. Fall Pond Care is important with water.  Cold Water Beneficial Bacteria to the pond once the temperature drops below 50 degrees. Use twice weekly for two weeks, and then once per week until the water starts to freeze.
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  5. Stop fertilizing your aquatic plants after the first frost.
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  6. Trim back hardy marginal aquatic plants to 2″ above the water to keep the dead foliage from drooping over into the pond.
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  7. Trim back waterlily leaves and stems to 2-3″ above the base of the plant. This keeps dead foliage from decomposing in the pond.
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  8. If you left hardy waterlilies in their pot, drop them into the deepest part of the pond to over-winter. Do not bring them indoors as they need a period of dormancy.
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  9.  All Pond Care requires you to bring tropical waterlilies indoors if you want to over-winter them. Keep the pot in 50-degree water or take them out of the pot and store in sand. Be advised, even trained horticulturists lose a lot of tropical waterlilies when storing them indoors, so you might simply want to treat them as annuals.
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  10. Once temperatures drop to 50 degrees, stop feeding your fish. They need to get ready to hibernate and you’ll want to avoid any metabolic complications. You can feed them Cold Water Fish Food until the temperature drops below 50 degrees.

Want more info? See how Aquascape does it!

Any questions? Contact us for questions and assistance.

 

Have you heard any koi pond myths? The truth lies below…

Have you heard any Koi Pond Myths?

One of the biggest reasons many people get a water garden is so they can have fish.  Don’t let Koi Pond Myths keep you from getting a few of your own finned friends of your own! Here are some common myths with replies from Aquascape, Inc.
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Koi Pond Myths
Koi Pond Myths

Myth:

Aquascape Says:

“Fish will just create more pond maintenance.” Actually, fish are a crucial part of the ecosystem. Koi reduce algae by feeding on it, and they fertilize plants with their waste. So, fish actually create less pond maintenance.
“Koi cannot live in a pond with rocks and gravel.” Koi originated in nature, where rocks and gravel cover almost every pond on earth. We build rock and gravel lined ponds almost daily, which house perfectly healthy and happy Koi.
“I don’t want to lose all my fish to predators.” If constructed properly, one can virtually eliminate the risk of predators with a few simple precautionary techniques.
“Koi need at least three feet of water to survive.” 95% of the ponds that we build are two feet deep in the center, and the koi are happy and healthy as can be.
“I don’t want to be troubled with bringing my fish inside for the winter.” Koi are an extremely hardy fish, whose ancestors over-wintered in freezing conditions, and still do. Just keep the water circulating and maintain a hole in the ice and they’ll never know the difference.
“I don’t want to spend thousands of dollars on my fish.” Actually, pet quality koi start at $5.00 each with show quality koi going for one hundred thousand dollars or more. Since fish food is also very inexpensive, how much you want to spend on fish is your decision.
“You can’t have koi in a pond that has rocks and gravel” Koi are actually just a fancy variety of carp, and all carp are bottom feeders. They love to swim along the bottom and scavenge everything that is available on and in-between rocks. In nature, it’s not uncommon to find ponds, lakes, or rivers with rocks on the bottom.
Contact us for more information

What does the average pond cost?

What does the average pond cost?

The average pond “shopper” may see this as a simple question, one that any landscaping expert could tell off the top of his or her head. In reality, a true expert will take this question and ask the shopper for a definition of “average.”

what does the average pond cost?
what does the average pond cost?

What does an average pond look like to you?

Sure, technically and mathematically, average equates to the sum of numbers divided by the amount of numbers, but an expert will ask the buyer to punch in those digits. The concept of “average” is difficult to define when playing with custom designed products. When it comes to ponds, each is individually crafted to fit the new environment, and as a buyer, you should keep in mind that the average numbers will fluctuate to your particular pond. But really– you might be asking– what does the average pond cost?

Common costs

For the sake of giving a ballpark number, we will implement the most commonly built ponds in our particular market, which would mean a pond about 10’ x 15’ in size. Given these numbers, the “average” will begin around $8,500 but commonly rounds up to about $12,000-$17,000. Now this range depends on how many custom features the pond aspires to have. A pond alone may be around $8,500 (at that particular size), but add-ons that many people envision in a pond, such as plants, lights, waterfalls, fish, etc., will add to the base price.

what does the average pond cost?
what does the average pond cost?

 

Customize-able features

Why would the final price tag of a pond be vastly different than the base model? Ponds, like cars, are very customizable. Certain people only want the car with roll up windows and an AM/FM radio. While others want the leather seats with a navigation system and an engine push start button. So when you ask for a basic pond, it doesn’t  include the add-ons that most people like in a pond. This will include fish, plants, lights, etc.  This can change the definition of what the average pond costs.

What can we do for you?

Before getting attached to these numbers, if you’re considering adding a water feature to your home, give us a call and let’s begin at a drawing board. We can provide you with details, options for your particular design, and digits that are worth contemplating. Who needs average when you can have it personalized?

Why should you get a fish pond?

  fish pond koi

Fish pond koi

Why a fish pond?  Some pond owners are nervous to create a fish pond. Some people have bad memories of ever-replaceable carnival fish or tiny goldfish swimming in circles.

Regardless of your past experiences with fish, when you get a pond, keeping fish is a whole new deal. Fish represent a vital part of your pond’s circle of life.

And when it comes to their life span, with the right treatment and a little TLC, your fish could end up out-living you.

Fish Pond Creatures
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fish pond
Fish pond
fish pond
fish pond

Fish are great living creatures in a water garden. They add color and interest to the water garden., but they are so much more. They are interactive and friendly, creating a lively element to your water garden for all to enjoy, especially at feeding time.

Of course, fish are also attractive, interesting, and even personable – much like your pet cat or dog. Their color can enhance the visual impact of a pond. Koi in particular, as a species, grow very large, and their sheer size adds an impressive element to some water features (but not without a significant impact on the balanced ecosystem).

There are numerous types of fish that you could put in your pond. The most popular are koi, goldfish, shubunkins, sarassas, orfes, and even catfish.

Basic Fish Pond Ground Rules

If you are new to water gardening or don’t know that much about maintaining fish, then remember the following basic ground rules.

First, fish need good, clean water. There’s a simple way to evaluate (at a glance) the suitability of your pond. If you wouldn’t let a child wade in the pond, then it’s not good enough for fish, either. The water should be clean-smelling. Clarity of the water right down to the bottom is good and a yellowing of the deeper water is bad. Green water is okay, but it can be troublesome.

Second, fish that are maintained in outdoor ponds can obtain nutrition from a variety of natural sources, such as wayward insects and plants, but they need a prepared (staple) food at least once per week.

If you choose to feed the fish every day, you definitely need a filter, but if you only feed them once or twice per week, the fish will grow slowly and will probably not (as far as waste goes) exceed the environmental carrying capacity of the pond.

Contact us for more information or with any questions.