Tag Archives: aquascape philadelphia

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths Debunked

Philadelphia Koi Pond
Philadelphia Koi Pond

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #1The presence of rocks and gravel make it difficult to clean your pond.

Reality   Rocks and gravel offer a natural place for aerobic bacteria to colonize and set up housekeeping in your Philadelphia Koi Pond.   This bacteria breaks down the fish waste and debris that would otherwise accumulate in the pond and turn into sludge. Regardless of your pond’s location (i.e. close to trees and loads of leaves), or how many fish you have in it, you’ll find that having rocks and gravel in your pond not only makes it look better, but it makes it healthier as well. So contrary to the myth, having rocks and gravel on the bottom of your pond actually allows Mother Nature to clean up after herself.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #2The more filtration, the better the pond.

Reality   Believe or not, you can over-filter a pond. Tight filter pads in your skimmer pick up the smallest particles of debris, causing you to be cleaning the filtering mechanism out constantly. Fish in the wild certainly don’t swim around in bottled water. If you can see a dime on the bottom of the pond, then the water clarity is just right for your fish and filtering past that create headaches instead of eliminating them.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #3:  Koi can’t be kept in a pond that also contains plants.

Reality   In a naturally balanced ecosystem, Koi and plants complement and need one another. In nature, fish feed on plants. As a result, the fish produce waste, which is broken down by aerobic bacteria on the bottom of your pond, which, in turn, is used as fertilizer by the plants to grow and produce more natural fish food.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #4: Your pond must be at least three feet deep in order to keep Koi.

Reality   There are thousands of two-foot deep ponds around the country, full of happy and healthy koi. The water in a two-foot deep pond will generally only freeze eight inches down, even in the coldest of climates, because of the insulating qualities of the earth that surrounds the pond.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #5You can’t be a koi hobbyist and a water gardener.

Reality   Not true! You can raise koi and have a beautiful water garden. The koi can grow up to be just as beautiful and just as healthy as they are in traditional koi ponds – and you’ll love them just as much!

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #6:  You have to bring your fish inside for the winter.

Reality   Fish do fine during the coldest of winters as long as you give them two feet of water to swim in, oxygenate the water, and keep a hole in the ice with a de-icer, allowing the naturally produced gasses to escape from under the ice.

For more answers or to see what we can do for you, please contact us!

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #7:  I should locate my pond to the lowest part of my yard.

Reality:   This is probably the worst location for your investment because of the run-off that can creep its way into your pond. When your pond is positioned near your house, you can take in the beauty and tranquility of your pond when entertaining friends or lounging on your deck.

For more answers or to see what we can do for you, please contact us!

 

Pond Ecosystem: Working with Nature

Pond Ecosystem
Pond Ecosystem

What is a Pond Ecosystem? A Pond Ecosystem is a pond that works with and for nature.   A Pond Ecosystem  works with the natural environment to provide food, shelter and protection to the wildlife around it.

HOW DOES A POND ECOSYSTEM WORK?

 

  • The fish nibble on the plant life (and everything else), including the algae.
  • In turn, the fish produce waste that, along with other forms of natural debris, fall to the pond’s bottom.
  • Debris is broken down by the aerobic bacteria and the other microorganisms colonized on the rocks and gravel all over the pond bottom.
  • Once broken down, these substances are absorbed as nutrition by the plants.
  • The plants grow and are once again nibbled on by the fish … ’round and ’round it goes, infinitely.

It’s important to have certain elements, however, and to use them together so that the system won’t become unbalanced.   There are five main elements needed by the pond for a low maintenance ecosystem.

Here are the five elements considered necessary for a low maintenance pond ecosystem:

1. Pond Ecosystem Filtration System

AquaReale installs a two part filtration system: biological filter and a mechanical filter.

  • A BioFalls® (biological filter) provides surface area for beneficial bacteria to colonize and remove excess nutrients from the water.
  • A Skimmer (mechanical filter) will not only pre-filter the water and house the pump; it will also skim debris from the water’s surface to prevent the accumulation of organic materials on the pond floor.

2. Pond Ecosystem Rocks and Gravel

Rocks and gravel protect pond liners from UV light degradation. They also provide a large surface area for beneficial bacteria to break down excess nutrients in the water and dissolved organic debris on the pond floor. This is a important step in an ecosystem pond.

3.Pond Ecosystem Recirculation System

This is just another term for what we call the pumps and plumbing

The proper size pump and pipe diameter are extremely important for the aesthetics of a water feature. More importantly, an efficient circulation system will keep the water moving and provide the necessary oxygen levels for healthy fish and plants.

 4. Pond Ecosystem Fish

Fish are a huge part of any natural pond ecosystem. They eat algae and other items on the pond floor, helping ponds stay healthy and clean.   Fish are also very fun; Koi fish can even be trained to take food from your hand! Fish are exciting for children and can be a great introduction for kids and nature.

5. Pond Ecosystem Aquatic Plants

Plants act as nature’s true filter, doing many services to your pond. They add character, color and dimensions to a pond, as well as help with filtering. Plants are crucial to an ecosystem pond. They thrive on excess nutrients, naturally filtering the water to help keep algae to a minimum.

 

So, in a naturally balanced water garden, you have this never-ending aquatic circle of life where all parts complement the others, and play critical roles in the pond’s natural born harmony.

Contact us for more information and to see how we can help you create your own natural pond ecosystem.

A unique approach to stormwater management

Philadelphia Stormwater Management

We recently did a project for Philadelphia’s Urban Tree Connection, through a grant provided from Media Star Productions.  Here, AquaReale co-owner Matthew Reale guides us through the project and how it was built to maximize stormwater management.

 

Take a video tour of our CH Festival display

Join Matt in Chestnut Hill, PA as he explains our booth set up at a recent outdoor festival there.

Feed and Caring of Koi Fish

 What do you feed  and care for a Koi fish?
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koi fish
koi fish

With a good balance of plants, you should only need to feed Koi for your enjoyment and to attract the fish closer.Without plants in the pond, Koi fish are dependent on you to provide them.  Plants provide them shade and hiding spots from predators as well as food.
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koi fish
koi fish

How often can you feed Koi fish?

If you decide to feed your fish, do so up to twice per week. Fish do not know the feeling of “fullness” and will eat until they die. Koi fish can become overweight, which can cause health problems or death. When you do feed your fish, don’t give them much more than a handful at a time. You may even find most of this food in the skimmer unit – don’t worry, your fish are getting plenty.  If there are plants in the pond, they don’t need much food at all.  They will get used to you feeding them and may eventually eat out of your hand!

If you want to purchase koi fish, Quality Koi Company one of the best koi companies in the world is located right here in South Jersey!

When do I feed them?

Make sure to only feed your Koi fish during the warm parts of the year, when fish are active. Once the weather gets too cold, the fish slow down their bodies, starting a type of hibernation. Once the water temperature reaches about 50 degrees, stop feeding your fish entirely.  Koi fish will continue to eat, though they cannot properly digest the food in this environment. The food will cause decay, and the fish will die.
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koi fish
koi fish

What if I don’t have or want plants?

If you really don’t want plants, you can feed the fish once a day, but NOT in the winter. Even without plants, feeding in the colder weather can cause Koi fish to die.
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