Tag Archives: bucks county koi pond

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths Debunked

Philadelphia Koi Pond
Philadelphia Koi Pond

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #1The presence of rocks and gravel make it difficult to clean your pond.

Reality   Rocks and gravel offer a natural place for aerobic bacteria to colonize and set up housekeeping in your Philadelphia Koi Pond.   This bacteria breaks down the fish waste and debris that would otherwise accumulate in the pond and turn into sludge. Regardless of your pond’s location (i.e. close to trees and loads of leaves), or how many fish you have in it, you’ll find that having rocks and gravel in your pond not only makes it look better, but it makes it healthier as well. So contrary to the myth, having rocks and gravel on the bottom of your pond actually allows Mother Nature to clean up after herself.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #2The more filtration, the better the pond.

Reality   Believe or not, you can over-filter a pond. Tight filter pads in your skimmer pick up the smallest particles of debris, causing you to be cleaning the filtering mechanism out constantly. Fish in the wild certainly don’t swim around in bottled water. If you can see a dime on the bottom of the pond, then the water clarity is just right for your fish and filtering past that create headaches instead of eliminating them.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #3:  Koi can’t be kept in a pond that also contains plants.

Reality   In a naturally balanced ecosystem, Koi and plants complement and need one another. In nature, fish feed on plants. As a result, the fish produce waste, which is broken down by aerobic bacteria on the bottom of your pond, which, in turn, is used as fertilizer by the plants to grow and produce more natural fish food.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #4: Your pond must be at least three feet deep in order to keep Koi.

Reality   There are thousands of two-foot deep ponds around the country, full of happy and healthy koi. The water in a two-foot deep pond will generally only freeze eight inches down, even in the coldest of climates, because of the insulating qualities of the earth that surrounds the pond.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #5You can’t be a koi hobbyist and a water gardener.

Reality   Not true! You can raise koi and have a beautiful water garden. The koi can grow up to be just as beautiful and just as healthy as they are in traditional koi ponds – and you’ll love them just as much!

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #6:  You have to bring your fish inside for the winter.

Reality   Fish do fine during the coldest of winters as long as you give them two feet of water to swim in, oxygenate the water, and keep a hole in the ice with a de-icer, allowing the naturally produced gasses to escape from under the ice.

For more answers or to see what we can do for you, please contact us!

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #7:  I should locate my pond to the lowest part of my yard.

Reality:   This is probably the worst location for your investment because of the run-off that can creep its way into your pond. When your pond is positioned near your house, you can take in the beauty and tranquility of your pond when entertaining friends or lounging on your deck.

For more answers or to see what we can do for you, please contact us!

 

Koi Fish Pond Summer Tips

Koi Fish pond
Koi Fish pond

 

Koi Fish Pond Care

The dos and don’ts of taking care of koi pond fish or regular pond fish in the summer

Koi pond fish and as well as all pond fish aren’t too difficult to care for in the summer.  It’s important to know, however, some important items for optimum health and comfort.

Feeding, plant cover and oxygen are all very important in a fish’s health during hot summer months.  Read on for details…

Koi Fish Pond Feeding

Feed your fish only as much as they will eat in 3-5 minutes.  Also, feed your fish far away from the skimmer box. Otherwise too much gets wasted and the pond gets dirty.

The use of a feeding ring will help keep fish food in one spot, allowing fish to get used to eating at that spot.  This also helps keep fish food from floating into your skimmer box.

Koi Fish Pond Plant Cover

Plants are extra important in the warmer summer months.  They provide shade for the pond, keeping the water cooler for the fish and they also provide additional filtration for the pond.

Try adding water lilies, water hyacinth and water lettuce.  Your fish will appreciate the shade.  In addition, be sure to remove dying leaves and flowers from the pond before they have a chance to decay in the warmer water.

Koi Fish Pond Oxygen

For hot summer months, make certain you maximize your aeration. Warm water holds less oxygen so more is needed in the summer.   Make sure you have plenty of aeration running 24/7. Aeration can be supplemented by using an air stone or additional pump if necessary.

And finally, keep your pond “topped off” – make sure the water level stays where it should be. This will ensure that the pump and/or skimmer are able to operate properly and will help keep your pond free of debris, while providing plenty of oxygenated water for your fish. The summer heat can be tough on oxygen levels.

 

These extra steps should help ensure maximum koi pond fish care in summer.  Contact us for additional information or to see how we can help you build or renovate the pond of your dreams.

6 Tips for Pond Plants

pond plants
pond plants

Pond Plants: 6 Tips for the Perfect  Plants

When it comes to planting in ponds,  you can apply many of the same tips and guidelines you use to create your terrestrial flower beds.  Things like color, height, and planting conditions are things you’ll want to consider when it comes to naturalizing your pond with plants.

It’s the amazing pond plants that truly put the “garden:” in water garden.

 

(1) Create Interest with Pond Plant Variety

Random placement of plants with varying textures and colors will create more interest than using plants that have all the same growth habit or leaf shape.

(2) Water Plant Colors

Choose colors you like best and consider the type of lighting your pond receives. Yellow, orange, and white help brighten shady areas, while cool blue and violet tone down the intensity of the sun’s rays.

(3) Go Green

A soft, calming space is created by using different textures and shades of green foliage.  You can also play with color based on leaf selection alone, since you’ll find aquatic foliage in a range of colors such as red, purple, yellow, and several variegated combinations.

(4) Pond Plant Size

. One of the biggest mistakes novice water gardeners make is failing to realize how big their pond plants might grow. Be sure to take height and width of the mature plant into consideration and allow enough space for future growth.

(5) Group  Pond Plants Together

Interior decorators tell you to group like objects together when decorating your home, to create visual impact. Use this same principle when planting your pond. Plant a row of marsh marigolds along a stretch of the ponds edge, as opposed to dotting them all around the pond in single locations.

(6) Consider Each  Water Plant’s Needs

Be mindful of how much sun your aquatic plants require, along with their planting depth. If a plant requires full sun, that’s a minimum of 6 hours of unobstructed (ie not dappled shade) sun per day.  If you’re not sure what your plant needs, ask the pro at your local garden center or search online for information.

Final thoughts

You’ll want to ensure an interesting mix of aquatic plant types for your water garden. Plant a few marginal at the pond’s edge, include colorful water lilies or even a lotus, add floating plants like water lettuce, and include submerged plants to help add oxygen to your pond.

Variety is the spice of gardening life, so don’t be afraid to experiment   For more information about pond planting and what we can do for you, contact us.

Small Pond: Plant Placement Ideas

pond plant diagram
pond plant diagram

 

Large Pond: Plant Placement Ideas

pond plant diagram-- large pond
pond plant diagram– large pond

The Penn Museum Pond: How we helped make it better

Large Pond Renovation
Large Pond Renovation

Large Pond Renovation Challenge

Why a large pond renovation? When AquaReale first went to visit the pond at the University Of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, it was not in great shape. The large 25 x 60 foot pond had not been cleaned for a few years and years of people throwing food in to “feed the fish” had left the water looking green and murky. In addition, the pond was not a healthy habitat for its fish.

The Penn Museum pond is loved and appreciate by thousands of people each year, and AquaReale wanted to make sure it was operating at its full potential. It had originally been built as a reflecting pool, which is not the best environment for fish, since the water is shallow and heats up fast.

The Large Pond Renovation Process

AquaReale began by draining and cleaning the pond. The fish were placed in a portable koi tank with their own water. After the cleaning, the fish were put back in the pond and the next step began. We worked in the pump room at the museum, updating the pumps, bead filters and UV units.

We also developed a system to trap sediment and allow water to flow slower through the filter. The sediment tank helps the filtration media do their job by slowing the water down.

And finally, we added some plants, which are very important in fish ponds. The pond had massive amounts of open water, which promotes algae growth and makes the water warm quicker. Plants provide cooler shade for the fish, especially important in a large shallow pond like this one.

The Large Pond Renovation Results

The Penn Museum pond looks much clearer since the cleaning and pump renovation. The green water is gone and the filtration media is working as hoped. The fish have more shade and cooler water and the pond is back to its former glory.

We recommended and continue to offer a maintenance package for Penn to keep the pond at its maximum health and beauty.

What can we do for your pond? Contact us to see.

How to care for your pond in the winter

Winter Pond Care
Winter Pond Care

Winter Pond Care
Frequently Asked Questions

So many questions come up here on the East Coast regarding Winter Pond Care . Here are a few of our top questions, along with answers from AquaReale owners Matt and Laura.

1. What does my fish pond need in the winter?

Winter Pond Care is pretty simple.  Ponds really only need one thing during the winter and that is air. As long as a pond is at least 18 inches deep, it shouldn’t freeze all the way to the bottom, so the fish will be OK. (link) You will need some way for the harmful gases to get out of the pond at all times. We recommend an aerator or bubbler.
Toxic gases caused by decaying matter and fish waste can become trapped under the ice by releasing harmful pond gases. An aerator or bubbler will leave a small area of the pond ice-free, which will allow the gases to escape. That’s all your pond needs!

2. When should I stop feeding my fish in the winter?

When the water temperature hits 50 degrees. This is usually around Thanksgiving. Don’t feed the fish when it gets below 50%, because their bodies are already shutting down and they can’t metabolize the food.

3. Can my pond keep running in the winter?

That depends on each individual pond. We can’t give one basic answer. If you has a submersible pump, the pump can stay running all winter. If you have an external filter system, you cannot run your pond during the winter. Other factors include length of stream, waterfalls and other variations in each individual pond. We recommend an aerator or bubbler even if you do keep your pond running all winter. For specific answers for your pond, please contact us.

 

 

Why should you get a fish pond?

  fish pond koi

Fish pond koi

Why a fish pond?  Some pond owners are nervous to create a fish pond. Some people have bad memories of ever-replaceable carnival fish or tiny goldfish swimming in circles.

Regardless of your past experiences with fish, when you get a pond, keeping fish is a whole new deal. Fish represent a vital part of your pond’s circle of life.

And when it comes to their life span, with the right treatment and a little TLC, your fish could end up out-living you.

Fish Pond Creatures
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fish pond
Fish pond
fish pond
fish pond

Fish are great living creatures in a water garden. They add color and interest to the water garden., but they are so much more. They are interactive and friendly, creating a lively element to your water garden for all to enjoy, especially at feeding time.

Of course, fish are also attractive, interesting, and even personable – much like your pet cat or dog. Their color can enhance the visual impact of a pond. Koi in particular, as a species, grow very large, and their sheer size adds an impressive element to some water features (but not without a significant impact on the balanced ecosystem).

There are numerous types of fish that you could put in your pond. The most popular are koi, goldfish, shubunkins, sarassas, orfes, and even catfish.

Basic Fish Pond Ground Rules

If you are new to water gardening or don’t know that much about maintaining fish, then remember the following basic ground rules.

First, fish need good, clean water. There’s a simple way to evaluate (at a glance) the suitability of your pond. If you wouldn’t let a child wade in the pond, then it’s not good enough for fish, either. The water should be clean-smelling. Clarity of the water right down to the bottom is good and a yellowing of the deeper water is bad. Green water is okay, but it can be troublesome.

Second, fish that are maintained in outdoor ponds can obtain nutrition from a variety of natural sources, such as wayward insects and plants, but they need a prepared (staple) food at least once per week.

If you choose to feed the fish every day, you definitely need a filter, but if you only feed them once or twice per week, the fish will grow slowly and will probably not (as far as waste goes) exceed the environmental carrying capacity of the pond.

Contact us for more information or with any questions.

koi pond

What is a koi pond and should I get one?

What is a Koi Pond?

A koi pond is a water feature which is designed to house koi, otherwise known as carp. Koi have selectively bred for centuries to achieve very large sizes and distinct patterns of white, black, gold, red, and orange on their bodies. Koi ponds are used as aesthetic features in gardens, atria, and other locations, and many people use them to add an Asian look and feel to their gardens.

What make a koi pond versus a traditional pond?

Some special features differentiate a koi pond from an ordinary garden pool or a pool filled with aquatic plants, because the pond is designed to house fish, and the fish have special needs.

While koi prefer dirty, muddy water and dense foliage, people usually like to look at them, so the pond may be equipped with a filtration system to keep the water clear, and the aquatic plants in the pond will be carefully managed. The pond also needs to be properly oxygenated to keep the fish healthy, and it may need to be fenced or covered with a screen to deter predators.

What do koi eat?

Koi enjoy eating plants, and when planning a koi pond, people generally select foliage that is safe for the fish to eat. Lilies are especially popular for koi ponds, although other types of plants may be used as well. Stocking must also be done with care, as larger koi will cheerfully eat smaller fish or each other, and the fish require regular feeding and inspections to check for general health.

 Where do you put a koi pond?

Many gardeners design a koi pond as a focal feature of a garden, and they may include seating around the pond or devise garden paths which all eventually lead to the koi pond.

Some koi ponds come complete with little islands, bridges, and similar features, and the pond is often designed to encourage people to linger and contemplate the colorful fish. Gardeners who like to meditate may construct a meditation platform near a koi pond, so that they can relax and clear their minds to the sounds of splashing water.

Gardeners who have not worked with koi before may want to consider hiring a professional to install a koi pond and establish the fish.

Koi Pond