Tag Archives: philadelphia pond

How to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation

Philadelphia pond renovation
Philadelphia pond renovation

How to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation

Now that spring has FINALLY arrived, you are back outside and possibly thinking about what you want to do as a Philadelphia pond renovation.    If your pond or water feature is still in the dreaming and wishing stage, now’s a great time to start planning!

Some people view ponds as simply a part of their house, like an addition. When it is done, it’s done.  While this is true with some projects, a pond is always evolving and changing as a living organism.  Don’t be afraid to plan a Philadelphia pond renovation for your pond to make it what you want right now.

Maybe you want the water to go in a different direction or you want a blog filter.  Philadelphia pond renovations can also include a stream or waterfall addition or even a pondless waterfall in another part of your yard.  Ponds revision possibilities are endless!

What to do now?

Get your ideas on paper!  While your dreams and wishes are still fresh in your mind, it’s the perfect time to get your thoughts down.  How to start?  Let’s think about what you want and how you plan to use your pond. What does your perfect Philadelphia pond renovation look like?

Items to consider when planning your Philadelphia pond renovation:

  • What’s speaks to you when you’re out? A spring in the woods? A stream at the mountain?  A bubbling rock at the beach?  Once you know what you like, it’s easier to recreation these on a much smaller scale.
  • What do you enjoy most about water gardening – the plants, fish, frogs, turtles, birds, or terrestrial landscaping? Build your dream pond with that as your emphasis.
  • What do you like (or dislike) about your existing pond?
  • What places have you visited that look and feel “perfect” to you? A stream in the mountains?  A spring in the woods?  Recreate aspects of these places on a smaller scale.
  • Where do you spend most of your time when you’re at home?  Will you spend more time outside or inside?  Plan with that in mind.
  • What would make your yard a “paradise?”
  • Would you like to be able to swim with your fish in a natural swimming pond?

When you answer these questions, you’ll be well on your way to enhancing or creating your own aquatic paradise. AquaReale is here for all your pond needs—for everything from a Philadelphia pond renovation to a full pond installation. Reach out today to see how we can help make your dreams a reality.

How much is a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

 

Philadelphia pond cleaning
Philadelphia pond cleaning

Do you need a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

Do you need a Philadelphia pond cleaning?  Does your pond have green or murky water? Is the algae taking over?  Is there a buildup of sludge or mulch?  Are your fish being eaten or sick?

Ponds of all sizes need to be cleaned at least once a year.

How much is a Philadelphia pond cleaning?

We get asked that a lot.   The true answer is—it depends (we have average pricing listed at the bottom.) Pond cleanings are a vital part of the maintenance process.    The more time you wait between cleanouts, the more time, effort and money it will cost to clean.

The pond cleaning in Philadelphia cost depends on three main factors:

 

#1—The size of the pond.

#2—The condition of the pond

#3—How long it has been since your last cleanout.

#1:  Pond Size.

The larger the pond, the more expensive it will be to perform a Philadelphia pond cleaning.    Larger ponds also can be retention ponds or mud bottom ponds, which need to be dredged and have a whole different cleaning process. Most ponds run from between 8 x 8 feet to 11 x 16 feet.  Ponds can be much larger as well.  We work on smaller ponds as well, some as small as 2 by 2 feet.

#2: Pond Condition

Aside from size and regular maintenance, the overall condition of your pond will be an important factor in determining how much your Philadelphia pond cleaning will cost.  Certain physical characteristics of your pond can factor in as well, including the type of filtration and whether you have a bog, wetland or negative edge environment.

#3: Time since last cleaning

Pond cleaning prices also vary depending on when you last had maintenance on your pond.   The better a pond is maintained, the less work it will take to do a full clean out.

Anything cleaned longer than a year ago will be charged a higher price to account for the extra time and materials needed to clean the dirty pond.

 Philadelphia pond cleaning cost

Philadelphia pond cleanings start at $700 for an 8.5 x 11 pond that was cleaned the previous year and increase from there.  Most cleanings are in the $850 range.

No matter when you choose to do your clean up, the important thing is not to wait too long.

Remember, starting your water garden season with a clean slate will cut down on in season maintenance down the road.

Contact us to schedule your pond cleaning and start enjoying your pond or water feature today!

Philadelphia Pond Fish: How many is too many?

Philadelphia Pond Fish
Philadelphia Pond Fish

Philadelphia Pond Fish Ratios

Most Philadelphia ponds include Philadelphia Pond Fish.  Do they say water or wooder?  (Philadelphia humor).  In fact, fish are often the reason people get a water garden in the first place!  Fish are fun to watch.  Many kids, including our own, name their fish.  It did make for an awkward experience when our daughter named our fish for our neighbors and then a fish died and she proudly told the neighbor her namesake was dead!

While Philadelphia Pond Fish create a memorable experience, they can also bring headaches to water quality if you go overboard when stocking fish. Too many fish in the pond creates an imbalance in water, so you’ll want to make sure you’re smart about the number and size of fish that you place in the water garden.  If you have too many fish, they won’t be healthy.

How much water per Philadelphia Pond Fish?

Philadelphia Pond Fish typically need 10 gallons of water for every inch of their length, but keep in mind they will grow larger over the years. So no matter how tempting it might be to add just a few more fish, be careful not to overstock! Some pond experts even go so far as to recommend only ½ inch of fish per 10 gallons of water as a maximum stocking density.

If you’re a fish fanatic, you may find yourself with a pond containing 2 or even 3 inches of fish per 10 gallons of water and the fish seem to be fine. However, the density and ecological strain of this loading can turn your pond into a fragile system. The pH tends to sag, the fish tend to grow more slowly, and disease can become a common occurrence.

Too many Philadelphia Pond Fish

It’s very difficult to salvage sick fish in a pond that’s overcrowded. Most likely, Mother Nature will sadly pick off your favorite fish to achieve her ideal stocking density based on the system the fish are in, and then the remainder may recover.

So before adding another fish to your koi collection, make sure you have ample space so that all your fish are ensured a happy, healthy home! Contact us for more information.

 

Bucks County, PA Fall Pond Care

 

Bucks County, PA Fall Pond Care
Bucks County, PA Fall Pond Care

Bucks County,  PA Fall Pond Care

It’s time for Bucks County, PA Fall Pond Care !  Shorter days, shedding leaves and a nip in the air means one thing—Fall is here!  Pond owners know this is the time to start getting their pond ready for the colder weather.  Water features require some special attention when putting your pond to bed for the winter.   Below are some basic guidelines to help plants and fish get through until next spring

1.Bucks County,  PA Fall Pond Care —leaves

Decaying leaves and foliage produce toxic gases that can harm your fish so you want to remove this debris before winter rolls into town. You don’t need to remove every single last leaf, but try to remove the majority.

2. Netting

If you put protective pond netting over your pond before the leaves started to fall, your job is easy. Carefully roll up the net and discard the leaves that were caught.

3. Leaves

If you didn’t use a net over the surface of your pond, you’ll need to remove the build-up of leaves from the bottom of the pond. Use a long handled pond net to scoop them out. Check your skimmer basket and remove any leaves that are still caught inside.

4. Bucks County, PA Fall Pond Care —Beneficial Bacteria

Add Cold Water Beneficial Bacteria to the pond once the temperature drops below 50 degrees. Use twice weekly for two weeks, and then once per week until the water starts to freeze.

5. Fertilization

Stop fertilizing your aquatic plants after the first frost.

6. Trim Back Aquatic Plants

Trim back hardy marginal aquatic plants to 2″ above the water to keep the dead foliage from drooping over into the pond.

7. Trim Back Waterlilies

Trim back waterlily leaves and stems to 2-3″ above the base of the plant. This keeps dead foliage from decomposing in the pond.

8. Bucks County,  PA Fall Pond Care —Additional Waterlily Care

If you left hardy waterlilies in their pot, drop them into the deepest part of the pond to over-winter. Do not bring them indoors as they need a period of dormancy.

9. Fall Pond Care—Bring Plants Indoors

Bring tropical waterlilies indoors if you want to over-winter them. Keep the pot in 50-degree water or take them out of the pot and store in sand. Be advised, even trained horticulturists lose a lot of tropical waterlilies when storing them indoors, so you might simply want to treat them as annuals.

10. Fish Feeding

Once temperatures drop to 50 degrees, stop feeding your fish. They need to get ready to hibernate and you’ll want to avoid any metabolic complications. You can feed them Cold Water Fish Food until the temperature drops below 50 degrees.

Contact us for more information about our maintenance program  or to schedule a shutdown.

Main Line, PA pondless waterfall

Main Line, PA pondless waterfall

 

Main Line, PA pondless waterfall
Main Line, PA pondless waterfall

Main Line, PA pondless waterfalls

are a great way for people with minimal space or time for maintenance to enjoy the sounds and sights of water. There is no pool of water at the bottom, so this helps with safety concerns as well.  We have installed many Main Line, PA pondless waterfalls.

Working much like a regular waterfall, the Main Line, PA pondless waterfall variety directs the cascading water into a deep rock-and-gravel filled hole where the water collects and is pumped back up to the top of the fall. A pondless waterfall is less costly than a pond to build and operate, and its size enables you to place one almost anywhere in your yard.

Maintenance could not be easier. All you need to do is fill the reservoir every few weeks to compensate for water loss caused by evaporation. A Main Line, PA pondless waterfall which has been properly incorporated into such a system can also increase property value by as a beautiful addition to your yard.

The greatest thing about a pondless waterfall for many people may be that they can be made to fit in any size yard. They are a low maintenance, low cost water feature.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths
Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myths

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #1:  I should locate my pond to  the lowest part of my yard!

Reality:   This is probably the worst location for your investment because of the run-off that can creep its way into your pond. When your pond is positioned near your house, you can take in the beauty and tranquility of your pond when entertaining friends or lounging on your deck.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #2It’s necessary to drain and clean your pond regularly.

Reality: If you decide to work in harmony with Mother Nature, then draining and cleaning your pond should take place only once a year (at most). Clean-outs should occur in the spring, before the weather gets warm and the bacteria has an opportunity to set up.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #3The more filtration, the better the pond.

Reality   Believe or not, you can over-filter a pond. Tight filter pads in your skimmer pick up the smallest particles of debris, causing you to be cleaning the filtering mechanism out constantly. Fish in the wild certainly don’t swim around in bottled water. If you can see a dime on the bottom of the pond, then the water clarity is just right for your fish and filtering past that create headaches instead of eliminating them.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #4You can’t be a koi hobbyist and a water gardener.

Reality   Not true! You can raise koi and have a beautiful water garden. The koi can grow up to be just as beautiful and just as healthy as they are in traditional koi ponds – and you’ll love them just as much!

Philadelphia Koi  Pond Myth #5The presence of rocks and gravel make it difficult to clean your pond.

Reality   Rocks and gravel offer a natural place for aerobic bacteria to colonize and set up housekeeping. This bacteria breaks down the fish waste and debris that would otherwise accumulate in the pond and turn into sludge. Regardless of your pond’s location (i.e. close to trees and loads of leaves), or how many fish you have in it, you’ll find that having rocks and gravel in your pond not only makes it look better, but it makes it healthier as well. So contrary to the myth, having rocks and gravel on the bottom of your pond actually allows Mother Nature to clean up after herself.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #6: Your pond must be at least three feet deep in order to keep koi.

Reality   There are thousands of two-foot deep ponds around the country, full of happy and healthy koi. The water in a two-foot deep pond will generally only freeze eight inches down, even in the coldest of climates, because of the insulating qualities of the earth that surrounds the pond.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #7:  Koi can’t be kept in a pond that also contains plants.

Reality   In a naturally balanced ecosystem, koi and plants complement and need one another. In nature, fish feed on plants. As a result, the fish produce waste, which is broken down by aerobic bacteria on the bottom of your pond, which, in turn, is used as fertilizer by the plants to grow and produce more natural fish food.

Philadelphia Koi Pond Myth #8:  You have to bring your fish inside for the winter.

Reality   Fish do fine during the coldest of winters as long as you give them two feet of water to swim in, oxygenate the water, and keep a hole in the ice with a de-icer, allowing the naturally produced gasses to escape from under the ice.

For more answers or to see what we can do for you, please contact us!

Fall Pond Care– Philadelphia

Fall Pond Care
Fall Pond Care

Fall Pond Care time has arrived!

 

It seems like someone flipped a switch and fall appeared!  With the colder weather, leaves are starting to come down and the beauty of fall is cascading in in.

Here’s a handy list of 10 Tips for Fall Pond Care…

 

  1. Decaying leaves and foliage produce toxic gases that can harm your fish so you want to remove this debris before winter rolls into town. You don’t need to remove every single last leaf, but try to remove the majority.
  2.  If you put protective pond netting over your pond before the leaves started to fall, your job is easy. Carefully roll up the net and discard the leaves that were caught.
  3. If you didn’t use a net over the surface of your pond, you’ll need to remove the build-up of leaves from the bottom of the pond. Use a long handled pond net to scoop them out. Check your skimmer basket and remove any leaves that are still caught inside.
  4. Add Cold Water Beneficial Bacteria to the pond once the temperature drops below 50 degrees. Use twice weekly for two weeks, and then once per week until the water starts to freeze.
  5. Stop fertilizing your aquatic plants after the first frost.
  6. Trim back hardy marginal aquatic plants to 2″ above the water to keep the dead foliage from drooping over into the pond.
  7. Trim back waterlily leaves and stems to 2-3″ above the base of the plant. This keeps dead foliage from decomposing in the pond.
  8. If you left hardy waterlilies in their pot, drop them into the deepest part of the pond to over-winter. Do not bring them indoors as they need a period of dormancy.
  9. Bring tropical waterlilies indoors if you want to over-winter them. Keep the pot in 50-degree water or take them out of the pot and store in sand. Be advised, even trained horticulturists lose a lot of tropical waterlilies when storing them indoors, so you might simply want to treat them as annuals.
  10. Once temperatures drop to 50 degrees, stop feeding your fish. They need to get ready to hibernate and you’ll want to avoid any metabolic complications.

For more information or a quote on fall service, contact us!

Garden and Pond Lighting

Do you have Garden and Pond Lighting?

The days are shortening in anticipation of the fall season and now is the perfect time to install your own Garden and Pond Lighting.

Check out this video to see how Garden and Pond Lighting can work for you….

 

Contact us for more information on how AquaReale can create beautiful Garden and Pond lighting for you!

What kinds of pond fish should I choose?

What kinds of pond fish should I choose?

Watch Tom as he explains his pond fish recommendations..

Montgomery County Pondless Waterfall

Oreland water feature
Oreland water feature

 

Oreland flagstone patio
Oreland flagstone patio

 

Jenkintown water feature
Jenkintown water feature

What to do with your yard?  Get inspired with our latest Montgomery County Pondless Waterfall and flagstone patio!

We worked with Fill A Bagel in Jenkintown to create  a small water feature outside their Jenkintown, PA store, but with the new Oreland store came a lot more opportunity.

Vicky and Charlie Ard are the owners of both locations and they own the physical building location in Oreland, located at 100 East Pennsylvania Ave,  AND there was plenty of green space there!

Vicki wanted a patio for her customers to sit and relax and enjoy their breakfast and lunch sandwiches and bagels.

When we talked about doing a water feature at the store, we decided we could do the patio for the Ards as well, creating a flawless space that is soothing and relaxing.  Customers can sit on the large sitting wall or on the patio chairs as they listen to the soothing sounds of water via  bubbling rocks and streams. The Montgomery County Pondless Waterfall adds visual and auditory delight

The patio is 16 x 14, made with Pennsylvania bluestone, irregular cut.  “We tried to match the aesthetic of the building,” says Matt Reale, co-owner of AquaReale.

The results…

Hundreds of people go through the stores  each weekend and Vicky and Charlie wanted them to have a pleasant place to sit and enjoy their food

“The patio turned out great, ” said Matt.  “It’s a cool and laid back place to hang out and eat your food.  Since the patio is enclosed on three sides, it’s easier for moms and dads to keep track of their little ones.  The Montgomery County Pondless Waterfalls  have no standing bodies of water, just recirculating bubbling rocks and streams.”

The reason for a dry laid stone wall instead of mortar?  “Concrete is needed for mortar on wet walls, and this can lead to more structural problems down the road,” explains Matt.  “Dry laid stone won’t weather like a man made product will.  Dry laid stone is more structural sound, as there is nothing to break apart or crumble.”

See what AquaReale can build in YOUR space!  Contact us for more information.